Building the Ideal Quality & Safety Department, Part III

Is a Clinical or Nonclinical Background Better?

Clinical or Nonclinical Quality Specialists

Does the Quality Specialist (QS) need a clinical background? Not necessarily.

Many successful QSs have come from diverse backgrounds, including coding, psychology, industrial engineering, finance, and manufacturing.

How To Stop Medication Errors

How to Design a Medication Safety Dashboard

Medication errors continue to be the most common errors in medicine. And this is after decades of work trying to fix this problem. We’ve used bar coding, double checks, triple checks, and no interruption zones, just to name a few. And they all help. But the problem of medical errors still continues.

I taught a one day workshop on Implementing Quality Programs for the Fall Institute of the American Association of Physician Leaders, formerly the American College of Physician Executives (ACPE) this past weekend.

We spent part of the day reviewing the major components in an Annual Quality & Safety Plan. We put the redesign of the medication administration process as a priority both within the Safety section and the Process Improvement section.

We did this because of the frequency of medication errors that persists in our hospitals – on average a hospitalized patient encounters one or more medication errors per day.

We also reviewed a template for a Medication Safety Dashboard. You know my favorite line by now: The only way to manage quality is to measure and report on quality. So here is a template for doing just that. It can be used throughout any organization, from the front line to the board room, to report and manage medication related errors. It’s also a great tool for physician engagement.

I’ve used some version of this Medication Safety Dashboard in many organizations. Click here to download an excel file and of course, feel free to customize as needed.

I would love to here from you. Do you have a medication safety dashboard you would like to share? If you do, just send me an email and I’ll set up a special page for sharing.

How a Medication Error Killed My Grandpa

Would "No Interruption Zones" Prevent Such a Tragic Outcome?

My Grandpa was one of my heroes. He had survived WWI, the Great Depression, and WWII, and yet, he still wore a smile on his face everyday. And he loved his grandkids, and his great grandkids.

I was taking the second part of the boards one day when the dean came into the auditorium and pulled me outside.

She said, “your grandpa has been in an accident. He’s over at St. Mary’s. Go to him and we’ll worry about this test later.”

I had just finished a cardiology rotation at this hospital and one of my professors was Grandpa’s cardiologist. This gave me a sense of hope that Grandpa would be OK.

My professor said, “your Grandpa has a pneumothorax (a collapsed lung); they put in a chest tube to reinflate it; his heart failure is stable; we fully expect that he will make a full recovery.”

I was so grateful my Grandpa had a good prognosis.

The next several days went off without a hitch, but then … three days later my professor called me aside, and he had a grave look on his face.

How to Solve Our Healthcare Patient Safety Crisis

And a New Resource That Can Help

We have a healthcare crisis of epic proportions – a patient safety crisis. It only came to light in the 1990’s, but its likely existed in all of our healthcare organizations for our entire careers. But so far, we have only made a dent in the problem. Our patients know this and they are afraid, their families are afraid, and when we’re honest with ourselves, many of us worry about being hospitalized in our own organizations.

Here are the sobering statistics:

  • 210,000 to 440,000 people lose their lives each year to medical errors in hospitals, according to research conducted by J. James and published in the Journal of Patient Safety.
  • Medical errors may now rank as the third leading cause of death in the United States; only cardiovascular disease and cancer takes more lives each year.
  • Preventable Adverse Events (PAEs) account for “roughly one-sixth of all deaths that occur in the U.S. each year.
  • More than 1,000 people die every day from preventable accidents in hospitals.
  • Preventable medical errors, in the form of “oops”, errors of omission, complications, readmissions, and avoidable mortality cost the US economy untold billions each year.
  • The average hospitalized patient experiences 1.5 medication errors daily and medication errors are the most common form of error.
  • There are more than 6 million patient injuries per year due to errors.
  • 40 percent of hospitals received a C, D, or F on Leapfrog’s Safety Score.
  • According to the Leapfrog Group, “since Fall 2014, (hospital) performance on safety outcomes – including preventing errors, accidents, and infections – has not significantly improved.”