Building the Ideal Quality & Safety Department, Part III

Is a Clinical or Nonclinical Background Better?

Clinical or Nonclinical Quality Specialists

Does the Quality Specialist (QS) need a clinical background? Not necessarily.

Many successful QSs have come from diverse backgrounds, including coding, psychology, industrial engineering, finance, and manufacturing.

Building The Ideal Quality & Safety Department, Part II

The Soft Skills are the Critical Ingredient for a Quality Specialist

My series on “Building The Ideal Quality & Safety Department” continues with this post.

I’ll post information every Monday until we’ve designed an entire department. When the series is complete, we’ll have a monograph, a step-by-step model for designing your dream department – one that gets results AND one where every FTE can be justified by a solid business case. I’ll publish it as an eBook so you’ll have all of this information in one publication. So let’s take a look at the soft skills for your Quality Specialist.

Building The Ideal Quality & Safety Department

Technical Expertise Required for Your Quality Specialist

I have received many questions lately about how to staff a quality and safety department. The most common questions are:

  1. How many staff do I need? Are there any benchmarks for effective staffing levels?
  2. What type of skills do they need?
  3. Do they need a clinical background? If not, what other type of education is ideal?
  4. My organization never approves my FTE requests and we can barely keep up. What can I do?

How to Become a Top 100 Hospital

It Can Be Done

When I started my first quality program, my teams and I only focused on one thing—improving care for our patients—and rightly so. Today, that is still my number one goal for every program I help build.

Along the way, we started earning quality awards, which I can honestly say wasn’t a top priority. But as more awards came into the organization, I started to see some interesting effects. Our employees were showing more pride in working for our organization. Improvements occurred with increasing frequency and physicians and nurses were asking to start new improvement teams. They had never done that before.

How Much Should We Measure in Hospital Quality?

Why some of the leading pundits have it all wrong

OMW! Here we go again. Yesterday in an editorial on psqh.com, Don Berwick is quoted as stating at the IHI National Forum in December 2015, that we should “cut in half all metrics currently being used and then cut them in half again.”

I wholeheartedly disagree. And here is why.

Clinical Dashboard – Hemorrhagic Stroke

Ischemic Stroke DB Pt 1

How You Can Create Your Own Total Knee Replacement Dashboard

It's Easier Than You Think

Creating a clinical dashboard is easier than you think – and with this template and tips you’ll be on your way to having a dashboard in no time.

Quick Tips to Get You Started

First, you need the design for the Total Knee Replacement (TKR) Dashboard. Download it here in excel format.

Second, you need to remember three “truths” about quality data.

Mandatory Bundled Payment Set for Total Joint Replacements

Bundled Payment Set for 67 Geographic Areas

The Associated Press reported recently that Medicare launched mandatory bundled payment for hip and knee replacements effective April 1. 67 metropolitan areas are on the list and more will likely follow, so preparing for bundled payment ASAP is the smart play.

What’s Your First Move?

The Quality Playbook is Here!

A Step-by-Step Guide for Building Quality & Safety Programs

Wow! Today is a big day for me, and I want to share it with you. The Quality Playbook has been released!

TQPB Set

What Makes This Book So Different?

Unlike many authors, I’m not an armchair sort of guy – I’ve been on the front lines just like you.

I’ve taken everything I know about making quality & safety programs work and created a Playbook for nailing it.

It doesn’t matter if you’re in a hospital, medical group, or even the system office – the tools, tactics, and plays in The Quality Playbook can be used everywhere.

If I Can Do It, You Can Too!

Here’s what no one else is telling you about implementing a quality program like the one I’m describing…

How To Stop Medication Errors

How to Design a Medication Safety Dashboard

Medication errors continue to be the most common errors in medicine. And this is after decades of work trying to fix this problem. We’ve used bar coding, double checks, triple checks, and no interruption zones, just to name a few. And they all help. But the problem of medical errors still continues.

I taught a one day workshop on Implementing Quality Programs for the Fall Institute of the American Association of Physician Leaders, formerly the American College of Physician Executives (ACPE) this past weekend.

We spent part of the day reviewing the major components in an Annual Quality & Safety Plan. We put the redesign of the medication administration process as a priority both within the Safety section and the Process Improvement section.

We did this because of the frequency of medication errors that persists in our hospitals – on average a hospitalized patient encounters one or more medication errors per day.

We also reviewed a template for a Medication Safety Dashboard. You know my favorite line by now: The only way to manage quality is to measure and report on quality. So here is a template for doing just that. It can be used throughout any organization, from the front line to the board room, to report and manage medication related errors. It’s also a great tool for physician engagement.

I’ve used some version of this Medication Safety Dashboard in many organizations. Click here to download an excel file and of course, feel free to customize as needed.

I would love to here from you. Do you have a medication safety dashboard you would like to share? If you do, just send me an email and I’ll set up a special page for sharing.